Category Archives: Youthshare

Announcing the CTLS 2017 SRP & YouthShare Workshop Series

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Please join us at one of the following locations for a combination YouthShare and Summer Reading Program workshop!

January 27th in Austin at Laura’s Library

January 30th in Diboll at the T.L.L. Temple Memorial Library

February 6 in McAllen at the McAllen Public Library

9am to noon– Discussing the 2017 Collaborative Summer Library Program manuals and theme “Build A Better World”
Break for lunch
1pm to 3:30– YouthShare, where youth services staff come together to learn from and share with each other.

Some ideas on what to bring for the YouthShare:

  • A favorite storytime book
  • Your calendar! Tell us about past and future program plans
  • Songs and fingerplays
  • Craft ideas for preschool and elementary ages
  • A puppet or prop you don’t know how to use
  • A question or issue that you need help with
  • STEM programming ideas
  • Recommendations for your favorite library performers and speakers

Please send your ideas of what you would like to share in advance to Katelyn Patterson (katelyn.patterson@ctls.net).

Let us know if you have any questions. Hope to see you there!

Holiday Program Ideas

Stories

Some stories, crafts and more for the Christmas holiday. Karen Chase – Catch the Story Bug.

Reuse an Old Favorite Story

Tell the story “The Twist-Mouth Family” with, well, a twist. The basic story is about a family that cannot blow out a candle so they can go to bed.  Each family member can only blow in one direction.  Mother can only blow down, father can only blow up, brother can only blow to the left and sister can only blow to the right.  To give it a holiday twist, Santa ends up blowing out the candle.

Some versions of this story:

Ready to Tell Tales by Holt and Mooney.  The title is “Santa Visits the Moes.”

Juba this and Juba That by Virginia A. Tashjian, “The Snook’s Family”

American Folklore

Christmas in Terse Verse

A white peppermint candy without stripes is a ……..plain cane

A happy holiday plant is a …jolly holly

Continue reading Holiday Program Ideas

Halloween Programming Ideas

compiled by Kim Lehman

RIDDLES

Why didn’t the skeleton dance at the Halloween party?

It had no body to dance with.

What do goblins drink on Halloween?

Ghoul-ade

What do ghosts eat for dessert?

Booberry pie

STORIES

Cut and tell pumpkin story

http://drjeanandfriends.blogspot.com/2011/10/pumpkin-stories.html

THE DARK HOUSE

The leader chants each line or every half-line in a soft, slow, sepulchral voice. Children repeat each line in the same way. The telling becomes more ghostly and spooky with each line. The last word is a sudden shout!

In a dark, dark wood, there was a dark, dark house,

And in that dark, dark house, there was a dark, dark room,

And in that dark, dark room, there was a dark, dark cupboard,

And in that dark, dark cupboard, there was a dark, dark shelf,

And in that dark, dark shelf, there was a dark, dark box,

And in that dark, dark box, there was a GHOST!

CRAFTS

Pumpkin Hats or Headbands

For headbands:  Cut out pumpkin shapes (3 per child).  Have kids decorate.  Glue onto green strips for headband.

Tootsie Roll Spiders – twist 4 black pipecleaners around the lollipop stick which will give you 4 legs on each side, add googly eyes to the center of the pipecleaners (where they twist on the stick), and you have a spider.  The lollipop portion is the back end.

Q-Tip Skeletons – Requires 3 or 4 q-tips placed horizontally, with 1 placed vertically to form spine.  Q-tips for arms and legs, and q-tips cut in half for feet and hands.  Pre-cut skeleton heads.  Glitter glue can be used to make the bones “glow”.

Ghosts – Requires fiberfill.  Trace a big ghost shape on black paper and let them glue the fiberfill on.  Then glue on eyes and an O shaped mouth.

Spider Hat – Cut the inside of paper plates about ¾ of the way around. Bend that part up. Draw a face on it for the spider.  Or glue eyes, cotton balls, circles, etc).  Glue 8 legs that have been accordion folded onto the bottom of the plate.

Paper Bag Jack-o-Lanterns – Requires paper bags, and orange dye.  Open the bags, dip the bags into the dye, bottom first, and give them a few seconds – the more time, the deeper the color.  (wear rubber glove on one hand, and put it inside the bag and push down into the dye bath)

Slime Recipe (big blob)

¾ cup warm water
1 cup Elmers glue
green food color

(mix these together)

Dissolve 4 teaspoons Borax in 1 1/3 cups warm water and add to other stuff.

Thanks to Elizabeth Murphy

Continue reading Halloween Programming Ideas

Craft Worm

Youth from Giddings Public Library created these worms as part of a summer program. Youth volunteers glued googly eyes to chenille sticks. They also attached a chenille stick “leash” to each worm. Children lined up to get their worm and some beads after the program. Then each child sat down and using fine motor skills, placed the beads in the worm.

Trudy Doerfler did an amazing job coordinating the youth volunteers as well as the craft itself. The crowd was very large yet the room stayed orderly and every child (around 75) made a book worm to take home. Trudy was both brave and innovative to implement this activity with so many people.

Youth News – A teen roundup from Kim

Events, tidbits, and resources rounded up for you by Kim Lehman, our Youth Services Specialist Extraordinaire:

Austin Teen  Book Festival

Date: Saturday, October 1, 2011
Time: 10:00am – 5:00pm
Location: Palmer Events Center, 900 Barton Springs Road,  Austin, TX 78704
Keynote: Scott Westerfeld (Uglies and Leviathan series)

I invite you to visit the websiteFacebook, and Twitter page for more information. Thanks to Jen Bigheart for this information.

http://austinteenbookfestival.com/

From Story Times to Blogger

Teens will be blogging, tweeting, photographing, and videotaping everything that happens at the Austin Teen Book Festival, and about the fest. One member of the teen press corps used to come to my storytimes many years ago. I recently ran into her and discovered that literature is her life. How exciting is that! You can follow Willa blog at http://willasramblings.blogspot.com/

Enter to win a free banned book on Willa blog. Deadline October 1.

National Gaming Day –  November 12

CTLS member libraries in Cedar Park, Bastrop, Buda, Bullard, and Belton are already signed up to participate in American Library Association’s National Gaming Day@ your library. To see all 800 participating libraries so far go to

http://ngd.ala.org/2011/09/21/ngd11-map-of-participating-libraries/

Talented Youth

Texas Commission on the Arts (TCA) would like your help in identifying exceptionally talented Texas youth (8th-11th grade students) for our Young Masters grant program.  Many of you work directly with youth and/or teachers of students of this age bracket.  Please make them aware of this program.  Students of all artistic disciplines apply for this competitive grant program.  The most talented young artists will receive the title of Young Master and will be given grants of up to $2,500 per year for two years to further their advanced studies in their chosen arts disciplines.
Deadline November 15, 2011
http://tinyurl.com/youngmaster

Teen Brains

September PBS show – Understanding The Mysterious Teenage Brain talk of the nation

Research suggests, that compared to adults, teens value rewards more than consequences. http://www.npr.org/2011/09/20/140637115/understanding-the-mysterious-teenage-brain

National Geographic Cover Article

After his son was pulled over for driving 113 mph, science writer David Dobbs set out to understand what researchers know about the teenage brain. The resulting story, “Beautiful Brains,” is the cover story in the October 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/10/teenage-brains/dobbs-text
Teen Programs on You Tube

Continue reading Youth News – A teen roundup from Kim

Youth News from Kim

Youth News from around the nation, pulled together for you by Kim Lehman, our Youth Services Specialist:

2011 Virtual Diversity and Outreach Fair
Held on June 25 at Annual Conference in New Orleans, this year’s Diversity and Outreach Fair highlighted innovative and successful library outreach initiatives and programs during a poster session open to all ALA attendees. The following “virtual” fair is meant to provide a glimpse of those presentations and includes links to resources provided by this year’s participants….read more

Book Trailers – Student Submissions
They still need more entries for student created book trailers in the School Library Journal’s Trailee Awards.  If any of your students have created trailers that were posted online between the dates of July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011 and meet the requirements, they would love to see them submitted.  The final 24 nominees will be announced at the SLJ Summit it Washington, DC and the winners will be announced in January.  Here is a link to the criteria for submission.

Free Tools for Creating Book Trailer Videos
Richard Byrne writes: “If you would like to add a new element to book reports, ask students to add audiovisual components and create book trailers. Book trailers are short videos designed to spark a viewer’s interest in a book. A great place to find examples of book trailers is Book Trailers for Readers. If you would like to have your students try to create book trailers, here are five free video tools that are well-suited to that purpose.”…

A Quick Guide to Using Creative Commons Images
Most guides for working with Creative Commons images are for those who want to pick a license for making their own work available. Even the CC site itself is geared toward Creative Commons license users, and not Creative Commons–licensed content users. So as a small public service announcement, here is a brief intro to CC image usage. First, Creative Commons licenses are divided up into six main license types, and each one can be tweaked to cover text, images, video, and other types of works….read more

Lone Star Reading List
The Texas Lone Star list is a recommended reading list developed by public and school librarians from the Young Adult Round Table. The purpose of the list is to encourage students in grades 6, 7, or 8 to explore a variety of current books. The Lone Star list is intended for recreational reading, not to support a specific curriculum. Due to the diversity of this age range, Texas librarians should purchase titles on this list according to their individual collection policies. Each book on the list has been favorably reviewed for grades 6, 7, or 8 in a professional review source. See the list of nominees.

Newbery/Caldecott Award Mock Election Programs
Newbery and Caldecott Award mock election programs are an ideal and fun way to encourage children to read; enhance listening, discussion, and communication skills; teach book examination skills; and foster appreciation of fine art and literature. Just in time for end-of-year election program planning, ALSC is offering a toolkit and a live webinar on August 24 and October 5….
ALSC

iPad Storytime Tools
Jennifer Hopwood writes: “E-book apps like Kindle, OverDrive, Nook, and iBooks can give us instant access to favorite stories. Interactive storybook apps can bring Winnie the Pooh and The Cat in the Hat alive in new ways. With the addition of an Apple VGA Adapter or the Apple Digital AV adapter, the iPad2 can mirror on a a VGA-equipped TV, monitor, or external projector exactly what appears on the iPad 2 screen for sharing with a larger crowd.”…
ALSC Blog, Aug. 13

Watch and Learn: Top Videos for Students.

Booklist put together a list of 25 recommended titles that fit into various areas of the curriculum. The wide-ranging topics include civil rights history, cyber bullying, drugs, freshwater biomes, Shakespearean characters, and much more. Titles are arranged by age groups. Lucas Miller’s Animals Rock with Lucas Miller! is on that list. Congratulations Lucas!

Story Songs & Sing Alongs
DVD with Debbie Cavalier for PreS-Grade 1.
Young audiences will love this compilation of musician Debbie Cavalier’s music videos and live musical performances.

Web Sites for Students
Students in Mary Ellen Quinn’s tenth grade summer history class put together a list of helpful resources

I Love My Librarian! Award
Nominations are now open for the 2011 Carnegie Corporation of New York / New York Times I Love My Librarian! Award. The award invites library users nationwide to recognize the accomplishments of librarians in public, school, college, community college and university libraries for their efforts to improve the lives of people in their community. Nominations are being accepted online through September 12.

Sara Jaffarian School Library Program Award
The Public Programs Office for ALA is accepting nominations for the 2011 Sara Jaffarian School Library Program Award for Exemplary Humanities Programming. School libraries, public or private, that served children in any combination of grades K-8 and conducted humanities programs during the 2010-2011 school year are eligible. Nominations must be received by December 15.

Association for Library Services to Children Wins APEX Award
The ALSC journal Children and Libraries has received a 2011 APEX Award for Publication Excellence. Three Children and Technology columns from the 2010 volume year won an Award
of Excellence in the category of “Writing: Regular Departments and Columns.”

Scotland Book Awards
Edinburgh writer Alette J. Willis was announced as the winner of the 2011 Kelpies Prize for Children’s Fiction at the Edinburgh International Book Festival for her quirky novel featuring
a mud-monster, How to Make a Golem (and Terrify People). The annual prize is run by publishers Floris Books and supported by Creative Scotland.

Australia Book Awards
The Children’s Book Council of Australia has announced the winners of its Book of the Year awards. The winner in the older readers category was Sonya Hartnett’s The Midnight Zoo and in the younger readers category, it was Isobell Carmody’s The Red Wind. There were two winners for Picture Book of the Year: Jeannie Baker’s Mirror and Nicki Greenberg’s Hamlet (NOT for young children.

Amazon Best Sellers
Two of the top best sellers this month are children’s books.
1. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Cabin Fever, by Jeff Kinney
3. Heroes of Olympus, The, Book Two: The Son of Neptune , by Rick Riordan

Storytime Prop – Rain


The heat is on and rain is nowhere in sight-at least not REAL rain. Here is a simple, inexpensive way to make a rain prop for storytimes. Cut strips of clear plastic, gather together and tape to a stick. You can also draw blue raindrops on the plastic strips with a permanent marker if you like. Move the stick back and forth quickly to make the rain illusion. Use this prop with songs, fingerplays and stories.

Thanks to Ellen Scott at the Austin Public Library for this idea. She and Karen Carlson used this prop in the puppet show “Chicken Big” based on a book by Keith Graves. Great show!!!