All posts by Kam McEvoy

Pat Tuohy Receives TLA’s Distinguished Service Award

At the TLA Conference this past week, Pat received the TLA Distinguished Service AwardWe are so proud of her! This award recognizes substantial demonstration of leadership to the profession. For over 30 years, Patricia Tuohy has provided outstanding leadership for the Central Texas Library System, a system that has grown from 37 to 80 libraries during her tenure.  She has also held a number of diverse TLA responsibilities, most notably serving as the Local Arrangements chair for Legislative Day in Austin since it began in the 1980s. Congratulations, Pat, for this well-deserved recognition!

Fund Your Summer Reading Program (and Teen Interns!)

Through funding from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation, YALSA will offer two kinds of grants for libraries to use in planning their summer reading programs.  The Summer Reading Grant will give twenty libraries $1,000 each for summer reading programs for teens in 2012. The Summer Reading Teen Intern Grant provides forty libraries with $1,000 each to utilize teen interns to aid in their summer reading programs. To read eligibility requirements and download an application for both grants, please visit www.ala.org/yalsa/awards&grants. Applications for both due Jan. 1.

Holidrama in Smithville

The Christmas party in Smithville is always fun. They choose a theme (this year, it was Fiesta!) and it’s interesting to see how it is carried out. Even the staff dress for the theme.

The library was full of people of all ages, enjoying the games & crafts on the tables, using the computers, riding in the wagon and trolley, and munching on refreshments. The turnout shows how much this library is appreciated by the community.  Matt Torrez and John Daniels, Jr. along with April Daniels of Playhouse Smithville held the childrens’ attention as they read stories and poems about llamas and llama drama. They were, after all, just trying to ensure that Grand Slam and Wild Diva, our four-footed South American guests, felt welcome in the library. It looks like they did, as they share their own bit of llama drama with their owners, Dan and Bev Johnson of DBJ Ranch in Giddings.

Holiday Program Ideas

Stories

Some stories, crafts and more for the Christmas holiday. Karen Chase – Catch the Story Bug.

Reuse an Old Favorite Story

Tell the story “The Twist-Mouth Family” with, well, a twist. The basic story is about a family that cannot blow out a candle so they can go to bed.  Each family member can only blow in one direction.  Mother can only blow down, father can only blow up, brother can only blow to the left and sister can only blow to the right.  To give it a holiday twist, Santa ends up blowing out the candle.

Some versions of this story:

Ready to Tell Tales by Holt and Mooney.  The title is “Santa Visits the Moes.”

Juba this and Juba That by Virginia A. Tashjian, “The Snook’s Family”

American Folklore

Christmas in Terse Verse

A white peppermint candy without stripes is a ……..plain cane

A happy holiday plant is a …jolly holly

Continue reading Holiday Program Ideas

CTLS’s DLC Program highlighted in TLA’s Texas Library Journal

Laura Perna, former Digital Literacy Corp Coordinator here at CTLS, wrote a great article in TLA’s Fall issue of Texas Library Journal called, “Collaboration Large and Small: The Digital Literacy Corps Draws Upon Human Talent to Bring Workforce Development Classes to Central Texas Libraries” (click here, then view pages 14-15). We are excited that this project was highlighted in Texas Library Journal and want to thank Laura for recounting DLC’s successes.

Around the world at Lake Whitney

Denise from Whitney says, “This is bringing in so many new library patrons and people just come to watch too. “
Adventures in Aviation, the flight simulation club sponsored by the Friends of the Lake Whitney Public Library is busy flying all over the world.  They now number nearly 30 members and are growing. The Simulator, being made available for library use by the instructor, former commercial aviation pilot, Bob Mangus, is available by reservation at no cost to library patrons 12 years and older. The club takes field trips to visit local airports and flight museums.  Several patrons have been introduced to the Young Eagles program available through the local EAA, Chapter 59, which sponsors it.  The flight club is sponsoring a “Christmas Lights” flight in a historic DC-3, which has been restored and maintained by the Greatest Generation Aircraft association of Fort Worth.  The club is also conducting private pilot ground school courses to prepare potential pilots for taking their private pilot written test.

FAQ: Cleaning DVDs

A flurry of responses on the discussion list prompts me to add this post. Thanks for your answers!

Q:

What do you use to clean your DVD collection?

A:

  • We hand clean every disc as it comes back in with the disc cleaner and disc restorer solutions from Demco.  If the discs are too marred to play we use a Disc-Go-Pod to resurface them.  It’s effective and and inexpensive machine.  The downside is that the machine must be emptied and cleaned after every use.  So we polish once a month and let the damaged discs stack up.
  • We use a really cool disc repair machine for our CDs and DVDs. It has been worth every penny. The company we bought our machine from was RTI (website = rtico.com). We purchased the Disc Repair System. They usually run a special on these machines at the TLA Conference. They allow you to get the machine in April/May and not have to pay until Ocober if you don’t have funds in your current fiscal year.
  • For routine cleaning we used a soft cloth & alcohol; for PbJ and other sticky stuff, wipe with a mild solution of water and dishwashing liquid. The cleaning machines are great, but expensive.
  • We use RTI’s Eco Senior.  It is expensive but worth every cent if you have a large collection.  It saves discs that would otherwise have to be thrown away.  I knew a video store owner who had one and charged people $3 a disc to run their personal CD’s and DVD’s through.  It helped pay for it, and I suspect a library could put such a charge into place if they had it on their fee schedule or else had the Friends group do it.
  • Check with your local Video Stone. They were upgrading to BlueRay and we brought their DVD cleaning machine $100. and if came with supplies for over 2 years. I have a volunteer that he does all the cleaning, it works great.
  • We use Memorex OptiFix Pro. It works ok in cleaning but not for repairing.
  • We use a simple Memorex OptiFix pro machine. It’s not great but it does help some.

The Cloud for non-profits and libraries

During the month of October, TechSoup led a Cloud Computing Worldwide campaign. They learned how organizations all over the world are using cloud computing through blog posts, webinars, and tweet chats. You can view everything that was shared on one handy webpage including these topics:

Week One: Introduction to Cloud Computing
Week Two: How Cloud Computing Changes Organizations
Week Three: Security in the Cloud
Week Four: The Future of Cloud Computing

Halloween Programming Ideas

compiled by Kim Lehman

RIDDLES

Why didn’t the skeleton dance at the Halloween party?

It had no body to dance with.

What do goblins drink on Halloween?

Ghoul-ade

What do ghosts eat for dessert?

Booberry pie

STORIES

Cut and tell pumpkin story

http://drjeanandfriends.blogspot.com/2011/10/pumpkin-stories.html

THE DARK HOUSE

The leader chants each line or every half-line in a soft, slow, sepulchral voice. Children repeat each line in the same way. The telling becomes more ghostly and spooky with each line. The last word is a sudden shout!

In a dark, dark wood, there was a dark, dark house,

And in that dark, dark house, there was a dark, dark room,

And in that dark, dark room, there was a dark, dark cupboard,

And in that dark, dark cupboard, there was a dark, dark shelf,

And in that dark, dark shelf, there was a dark, dark box,

And in that dark, dark box, there was a GHOST!

CRAFTS

Pumpkin Hats or Headbands

For headbands:  Cut out pumpkin shapes (3 per child).  Have kids decorate.  Glue onto green strips for headband.

Tootsie Roll Spiders – twist 4 black pipecleaners around the lollipop stick which will give you 4 legs on each side, add googly eyes to the center of the pipecleaners (where they twist on the stick), and you have a spider.  The lollipop portion is the back end.

Q-Tip Skeletons – Requires 3 or 4 q-tips placed horizontally, with 1 placed vertically to form spine.  Q-tips for arms and legs, and q-tips cut in half for feet and hands.  Pre-cut skeleton heads.  Glitter glue can be used to make the bones “glow”.

Ghosts – Requires fiberfill.  Trace a big ghost shape on black paper and let them glue the fiberfill on.  Then glue on eyes and an O shaped mouth.

Spider Hat – Cut the inside of paper plates about ¾ of the way around. Bend that part up. Draw a face on it for the spider.  Or glue eyes, cotton balls, circles, etc).  Glue 8 legs that have been accordion folded onto the bottom of the plate.

Paper Bag Jack-o-Lanterns – Requires paper bags, and orange dye.  Open the bags, dip the bags into the dye, bottom first, and give them a few seconds – the more time, the deeper the color.  (wear rubber glove on one hand, and put it inside the bag and push down into the dye bath)

Slime Recipe (big blob)

¾ cup warm water
1 cup Elmers glue
green food color

(mix these together)

Dissolve 4 teaspoons Borax in 1 1/3 cups warm water and add to other stuff.

Thanks to Elizabeth Murphy

Continue reading Halloween Programming Ideas