Category Archives: CTLS

FAQ: Cleaning DVDs

A flurry of responses on the discussion list prompts me to add this post. Thanks for your answers!

Q:

What do you use to clean your DVD collection?

A:

  • We hand clean every disc as it comes back in with the disc cleaner and disc restorer solutions from Demco.  If the discs are too marred to play we use a Disc-Go-Pod to resurface them.  It’s effective and and inexpensive machine.  The downside is that the machine must be emptied and cleaned after every use.  So we polish once a month and let the damaged discs stack up.
  • We use a really cool disc repair machine for our CDs and DVDs. It has been worth every penny. The company we bought our machine from was RTI (website = rtico.com). We purchased the Disc Repair System. They usually run a special on these machines at the TLA Conference. They allow you to get the machine in April/May and not have to pay until Ocober if you don’t have funds in your current fiscal year.
  • For routine cleaning we used a soft cloth & alcohol; for PbJ and other sticky stuff, wipe with a mild solution of water and dishwashing liquid. The cleaning machines are great, but expensive.
  • We use RTI’s Eco Senior.  It is expensive but worth every cent if you have a large collection.  It saves discs that would otherwise have to be thrown away.  I knew a video store owner who had one and charged people $3 a disc to run their personal CD’s and DVD’s through.  It helped pay for it, and I suspect a library could put such a charge into place if they had it on their fee schedule or else had the Friends group do it.
  • Check with your local Video Stone. They were upgrading to BlueRay and we brought their DVD cleaning machine $100. and if came with supplies for over 2 years. I have a volunteer that he does all the cleaning, it works great.
  • We use Memorex OptiFix Pro. It works ok in cleaning but not for repairing.
  • We use a simple Memorex OptiFix pro machine. It’s not great but it does help some.

Halloween Programming Ideas

compiled by Kim Lehman

RIDDLES

Why didn’t the skeleton dance at the Halloween party?

It had no body to dance with.

What do goblins drink on Halloween?

Ghoul-ade

What do ghosts eat for dessert?

Booberry pie

STORIES

Cut and tell pumpkin story

http://drjeanandfriends.blogspot.com/2011/10/pumpkin-stories.html

THE DARK HOUSE

The leader chants each line or every half-line in a soft, slow, sepulchral voice. Children repeat each line in the same way. The telling becomes more ghostly and spooky with each line. The last word is a sudden shout!

In a dark, dark wood, there was a dark, dark house,

And in that dark, dark house, there was a dark, dark room,

And in that dark, dark room, there was a dark, dark cupboard,

And in that dark, dark cupboard, there was a dark, dark shelf,

And in that dark, dark shelf, there was a dark, dark box,

And in that dark, dark box, there was a GHOST!

CRAFTS

Pumpkin Hats or Headbands

For headbands:  Cut out pumpkin shapes (3 per child).  Have kids decorate.  Glue onto green strips for headband.

Tootsie Roll Spiders – twist 4 black pipecleaners around the lollipop stick which will give you 4 legs on each side, add googly eyes to the center of the pipecleaners (where they twist on the stick), and you have a spider.  The lollipop portion is the back end.

Q-Tip Skeletons – Requires 3 or 4 q-tips placed horizontally, with 1 placed vertically to form spine.  Q-tips for arms and legs, and q-tips cut in half for feet and hands.  Pre-cut skeleton heads.  Glitter glue can be used to make the bones “glow”.

Ghosts – Requires fiberfill.  Trace a big ghost shape on black paper and let them glue the fiberfill on.  Then glue on eyes and an O shaped mouth.

Spider Hat – Cut the inside of paper plates about ¾ of the way around. Bend that part up. Draw a face on it for the spider.  Or glue eyes, cotton balls, circles, etc).  Glue 8 legs that have been accordion folded onto the bottom of the plate.

Paper Bag Jack-o-Lanterns – Requires paper bags, and orange dye.  Open the bags, dip the bags into the dye, bottom first, and give them a few seconds – the more time, the deeper the color.  (wear rubber glove on one hand, and put it inside the bag and push down into the dye bath)

Slime Recipe (big blob)

¾ cup warm water
1 cup Elmers glue
green food color

(mix these together)

Dissolve 4 teaspoons Borax in 1 1/3 cups warm water and add to other stuff.

Thanks to Elizabeth Murphy

Continue reading Halloween Programming Ideas

Youth News – A teen roundup from Kim

Events, tidbits, and resources rounded up for you by Kim Lehman, our Youth Services Specialist Extraordinaire:

 

From Story Times to Blogger

Teens will be blogging, tweeting, photographing, and videotaping everything that happens at the Austin Teen Book Festival, and about the fest. One member of the teen press corps used to come to my storytimes many years ago. I recently ran into her and discovered that literature is her life. How exciting is that! You can follow Willa blog at http://willasramblings.com/

Enter to win a free banned book on Willa blog. Deadline October 1.

Talented Youth

Texas Commission on the Arts (TCA) would like your help in identifying exceptionally talented Texas youth (8th-11th grade students) for our Young Masters grant program.  Many of you work directly with youth and/or teachers of students of this age bracket.  Please make them aware of this program.  Students of all artistic disciplines apply for this competitive grant program.  The most talented young artists will receive the title of Young Master and will be given grants of up to $2,500 per year for two years to further their advanced studies in their chosen arts disciplines.
Deadline November 15, 2011
http://tinyurl.com/youngmaster

Teen Brains

September PBS show – Understanding The Mysterious Teenage Brain talk of the nation

Research suggests, that compared to adults, teens value rewards more than consequences. http://www.npr.org/2011/09/20/140637115/understanding-the-mysterious-teenage-brain

National Geographic Cover Article

After his son was pulled over for driving 113 mph, science writer David Dobbs set out to understand what researchers know about the teenage brain. The resulting story, “Beautiful Brains,” is the cover story in the October 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/10/teenage-brains/dobbs-text

Teen Programs on You Tube

Continue reading Youth News – A teen roundup from Kim

Youth News from Kim

Youth News from around the nation, pulled together for you by Kim Lehman, our Youth Services Specialist:

2011 Virtual Diversity and Outreach Fair
Held on June 25 at Annual Conference in New Orleans, this year’s Diversity and Outreach Fair highlighted innovative and successful library outreach initiatives and programs during a poster session open to all ALA attendees. The following “virtual” fair is meant to provide a glimpse of those presentations and includes links to resources provided by this year’s participants….read more

Free Tools for Creating Book Trailer Videos
Richard Byrne writes: “If you would like to add a new element to book reports, ask students to add audiovisual components and create book trailers. Book trailers are short videos designed to spark a viewer’s interest in a book. A great place to find examples of book trailers is Book Trailers for Readers. If you would like to have your students try to create book trailers, here are five free video tools that are well-suited to that purpose.”…

A Quick Guide to Using Creative Commons Images
Most guides for working with Creative Commons images are for those who want to pick a license for making their own work available. Even the CC site itself is geared toward Creative Commons license users, and not Creative Commons–licensed content users. So as a small public service announcement, here is a brief intro to CC image usage. First, Creative Commons licenses are divided up into six main license types, and each one can be tweaked to cover text, images, video, and other types of works….read more

Lone Star Reading List
The Texas Lone Star list is a recommended reading list developed by public and school librarians from the Young Adult Round Table. The purpose of the list is to encourage students in grades 6, 7, or 8 to explore a variety of current books. The Lone Star list is intended for recreational reading, not to support a specific curriculum. Due to the diversity of this age range, Texas librarians should purchase titles on this list according to their individual collection policies. Each book on the list has been favorably reviewed for grades 6, 7, or 8 in a professional review source. See the list of nominees.

iPad Storytime Tools
Jennifer Hopwood writes: “E-book apps like Kindle, OverDrive, Nook, and iBooks can give us instant access to favorite stories. Interactive storybook apps can bring Winnie the Pooh and The Cat in the Hat alive in new ways. With the addition of an Apple VGA Adapter or the Apple Digital AV adapter, the iPad2 can mirror on a a VGA-equipped TV, monitor, or external projector exactly what appears on the iPad 2 screen for sharing with a larger crowd.”…
ALSC Blog, Aug. 13

Watch and Learn: Top Videos for Students.

Booklist put together a list of 25 recommended titles that fit into various areas of the curriculum. The wide-ranging topics include civil rights history, cyber bullying, drugs, freshwater biomes, Shakespearean characters, and much more. Titles are arranged by age groups. Lucas Miller’s Animals Rock with Lucas Miller! is on that list. Congratulations Lucas!

Story Songs & Sing Alongs
DVD with Debbie Cavalier for PreS-Grade 1.
Young audiences will love this compilation of musician Debbie Cavalier’s music videos and live musical performances.

Web Sites for Students
Students in Mary Ellen Quinn’s tenth grade summer history class put together a list of helpful resources

I Love My Librarian! Award
Nominations are now open for the 2011 Carnegie Corporation of New York / New York Times I Love My Librarian! Award. The award invites library users nationwide to recognize the accomplishments of librarians in public, school, college, community college and university libraries for their efforts to improve the lives of people in their community. Nominations are being accepted online through September 12.

Amazon Best Sellers
Two of the top best sellers this month are children’s books.
1. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Cabin Fever, by Jeff Kinney
3. Heroes of Olympus, The, Book Two: The Son of Neptune , by Rick Riordan

Fun Songs for Storytime

CTLS’s Kim Lehman sings some very fun songs to add to storytime:
Ain’t Gonna Rain – yes, it feels like it never will.

aint-gonna-rain

Oh, it ain’t gonna rain no more, no more.
It ain’t gonna rain no more.
How in the heck can I wash around my neck.
if it ain’t gonna rain no more.

What did the blackbird say to the crow,
It ain’t gonna rain no more.
Ain’t gonna hail, ain’t gonna snow,
It ain’t gonna rain no more.

Apples and Bananas – this is one that Miss Jenn at Austin Public Library’s Carver Branch sings with her kids, too.

apples-and-bananas

I like to eat, eat, eat apples and bananas
I like to eat, eat, eat apples and bananas

A
I like to ate, ate, ate ay-ples and ba-nay-nays
I like to ate, ate, ate ay-ples and ba-nay-nays

E
I like to eat, eat, eat ee-ples and bee-nee-nees
I like to eat, eat, eat ee-ples and bee-nee-nees

I
I like to ite, ite, ite i-ples and by-ny-nys
I like to ite, ite, ite i-ples and by-ny-nys

O
I like to ote, ote, ote oh-ples and bo-no-nos
I like to ote, ote, ote oh-ples and bo-no-nos

U
I like to oot, oot, oot oo-ples and boo-noo-noos
I like to oot, oot, oot oo-ples and boo-noo-noos

Diggin’ Up Books – by Trudy Doerfler. The recording of Trudy (from Giddings Public Library) singing this song did not work out so this is Kim’s version of the song.  The children loved singing this song with Trudy. She included digging movements.digging-up-books

Diggin’ up books, Diggin’ up books,
I’m diggin’ up books, I’m diggin’ up books,
I’m diggin’ up books
Take a look, look at me, can’t you see,
I’m reading stories, think’ more things,
…learning, …words are turnin’…,
Diggin’ up books, Diggin’ up books.

Little Red WagonHear Raffi’s version of the song. (I personally love Kim’s version! And Hugh Hanley’s – Kam)

little-red-wagon

Bumping downtown in my little red wagon,
Bumping downtown in my little red wagon,
Bumping downtown in my little red wagon,
Bump, bump, bump, bump, bump.

Flying around in my little blue airplane,
Flying around in my little blue airplane,
Flying around in my little blue airplane,
Up, up, up, up, up.

I have also seen these extra lyrics if your kids want more verses:

Bumping up and down on my little brown donkey, repeat twice
“Let’s ride off together!” or “Won’t you be my darling?”
Bumping up and down in my little black buggy, repeat twice
“Let’s ride off together!” or “Won’t you be my darling?”
Bumping up and down in my little blue trolley, repeat twice
“Let’s ride off together!” or “Won’t you be my darling?”
Gliding up and down in my little white sailboat, repeat twice
“Let’s ride off together!” or “Won’t you be my darling?”

Librarians in the U.S. from 1880-2009

Oxford University Press has analyzed 120 years of census data and showed some trends in librarianship. This is pretty interesting data with lots of graphs and charts! View it here!

The U.S. Census first collected data on librarians in 1880, a year after the founding of the American Library Association. They only counted 636 librarians nationwide. Indeed, one respondent reported on his census form that he was the “Librarian of Congress.” The U.S. Census, which became organized as a permanent Bureau in 1902, can be used to track the growth of the library profession. The number of librarians grew over the next hundred years, peaking at 307,273 in 1990. Then, the profession began to shrink, and as of 2009, it had dropped by nearly a third to 212,742. The data enable us to measure the growth, the gender split in this profession known to be mostly female, and to explore other divides in income and education, as they changed over time.

We examined a number of socioeconomic trends over the duration, and focused in on 1950 the first year that detailed wage data were recorded, 1990 at the peak of the profession and 2009 the most currently available data.1 We looked at data within the profession and made comparisons across the work world.

By Sydney Beveridge, Susan Weber and Andrew A. Beveridge via the Oxford University Press blog

Is your Friends group holding a raffle?

James in Waco pointed us to some useful resources provided by the Texas Attorney General’s Office to be sure your Friends Group, your non-profit library, or a support group of your library runs a raffle correctly. “There are specific laws and rules in Texas regarding charitable raffles – such as: entities that may conduct raffles, types and values of prizes allowed, how and where it can be advertised, the selling of tickets and specific wording that must be on each raffle ticket.”

Temporary Tattoo Information!

Several of you have asked where we got the temporary tattoos we were handing out at TLA. The design was the artwork of our very own Kam McEvoy and we ordered them from TattooSales.com. You can order artwork they already have or you can do a custom design like we did! They were very reasonable… around $150 for 5,000 tattoos. Cover your patrons with your library logo! We would also like to take this opportunity to thank the Friends of CTLS for purchasing the tattoos for us. They were a big hit and made TLA even more fun!

Let Katelyn know if you have any other questions about the tattoos!